African Conservation Course

African Conservation Studies Course

African Conservation Studies Course

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Course Price:  £449

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 £230 followed by 3 x monthly payments of £90

(Course cost is all inclusive of tutoring fees, assessments, materials and course registration)

African Studies Diploma
African conservation course

Course Accreditation

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QLS-02361


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Continued Professional Development

This course counts for 60 hours CPD

Anyone 18 or over and studying our African Conservation Studies Diploma Course is eligible for ZSL (Zoological Society of London) Fellowship.

African Conservation Studies Diploma
Level 3

  • This African Conservation Course explores the major ecological crises affecting African wildlife.
  • Learn about African Wildlife Ecology, Big Cat Conservation, African Herbivore Conservation, African Primate Conservation and the conservation of African Predators. 
  • The course explores the impacts that human population growth, deforestation, poaching & illegal trade, habitat destruction, pollution, etc have on African Wildlife. It also evaluates current practices and policies in African Wildlife Management.
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African wildlife course

Module 1

African Wildlife Ecology

Module 1 of the African Conservation Course studies African Wildlife Ecology. Learn about the concept of “ecosystem”:  Terrestrial, aquatic, biological and physical components, interactions and dependency.

Learn about food chains and the effect of imbalances: Trophic levels, herbivores, carnivores, omnivores, predators and prey and imbalances.


Module 2

African Ecological Crises

This module explores the major ecological crises affecting African wildlife. Learn about the effects of human population growth, deforestation, poaching & illegal trade, habitat destruction, pollution, & more.


Module 3

Big Cat Conservation

Learn about the conservation threats facing African big cats, and practices and policies in managing big cats in Africa.


Module 4

Conservation of other African Predators

Learn about the role of scavengers in the African ecosystem. Explore the conservation threats to 3 African predators (excluding the big cats covered in module 3).


Module 5

Conservation of African Herbivores

Learn about the conservation and management issues affecting African herbivore populations.


Module 6

Conservation of African Primates

This module explores the major conservation threats facing African apes.

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Free with this course 2 ebooks - over 600 pages of exclusive content - Volunteering with Animals and Working with Animals, compiled and written by the Animal Jobs Direct team of animal care professionals.

enrol now text

£449

instalment option text

 £230 followed by 3 x monthly payments of £90

(Course cost is all inclusive of tutoring fees, assessments, materials and course registration)

Click here   if you would like more information about us and how to enrol and study

Contact us  to discuss this African Conservation Studies Course 

There are two types of ecological crises; one is human-induced and the other is caused by natural events. Broadly speaking an ecological crisis defines a situation where an environment is changed in a way that destabilises the ecosystem to the point that the survival of species and/or populations is threatened with extinction. Although incidences of climate change are recorded in pre-human history, recent changes are considered by some to be the result of human activity. However the evidence is doubtful in many cases and these considerations are based upon only a hundred years or so of reliable data. Increases in temperature and altered rainfall patterns affect global ecosystems. Another type of ecological crisis occurs when increased predation pressure changes the environment in a way that renders it less favourable for some species. Examples of this are over-fishing, and the hunting to extinction of some species used as food by humans. Overpopulation of one species may also leave an environment unfavourable for other species. For example, removal of top predators from an ecosystem may result in the overpopulation of prey species, which can lead to over-grazing and degradation of the land. Natural events can also cause ecological crises, and include volcanic eruptions, tsunamis, earthquakes and fires. These events have the capacity to eradicate significant numbers of organisms, including vegetation and animal life. The result on the environment can be devastating, taking years for the soil and vegetation to recover enough to sustain consumers. This african conservation course explores the major ecological issues and impacts affecting african wildlife.


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