Dog Aggression Course

Dog Aggression Diploma Course

Theory and Practical Training!

Course fees include 1:1 Practical Training Day

Dog Aggression Diploma Course Plus 1 Day Intensive Practical Training

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Course Price:  £699


Enroll Now Installment Option

£325 followed by 5 x monthly payments of £90

(Course cost is all inclusive of tutoring fees, assessments, materials and course registration)

Dog Aggression Diploma 
Level 4

Course Accreditation

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QLS-02224

Dog Aggression Diploma
Level 4

This in-depth and comprehensive course has been designed for those who want to work with dogs in the areas of canine behaviour, rescue or training. 

Learn about dog aggression, bite inhibition, prevention, principles of behaviour change and the various influences on aggression.

This 6 module theory course includes a 1 day intensive Practical training day.

Please click here for more information about course accreditation

Continued Professional Development

This course counts for 98 hours CPD

Dog Aggression Diploma 
Level 4
Dog Aggression Diploma 
Level 4

Module 1

A Perspective on aggression

Module 1 of this course explores the risk factors associated with aggression and the different categories of aggression


Module 2

Professional ethics

Module 2 explores the role of the canine behaviour practitioner, principles, ethics and competencies


Module 3

Biological influence on aggression

This module explores the biological context of aggression and the role stress can play


Module 4

Why dogs are aggressive and how to prevent aggression

This module includes information bite inhibition, early recognition, genetic influences and principles of prevention.

 


Module 5

Principles of behaviour change programmes

This module explores the components of a behaviour change programme


Module 6

Behaviour change strategies and case studies

This module explores strategies for behaviour change and a look at a number of case studies


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Free with this course 2 ebooks - over 600 pages of exclusive content - Volunteering with Animals and Working with Animals, compiled and written by the Animal Jobs Direct team of animal care professionals.

Enroll Now

£699

Course includes Practical Training Day

Enroll Now Installment Option

 £325 followed by 5 x monthly payments of £90

(Course cost is all inclusive of tutoring fees, assessments, materials and course registration)

Click here   if you would like more information about us and how to enrol and study

Contact us  to discuss this Dog Aggression Course

This is theory and practical course, designed for those who want to work with dogs in the areas of canine behaviour, rescue or training. 

Learn about dog aggression, bite inhibition, prevention, principles of behaviour change and the various influences on aggression

The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 introduced penalties such as the destruction of various breeds of dog with penalties for owners, including being disqualified from owning a dog for a period to be specified by the court. The Act has failed to stop the increase in dangerous dog breeds and has not prevented the number of bites by dogs, currently estimated to be around 200,000 each year. 

It is now a crime to allow a dog to be dangerously out of control on private property. The previous Acts had only covered attacks by dogs in public places. Many people believe that it is the owner’s fault and not the dog’s if or when it attacks or behaves aggressively. This is because, while some breeds are deemed more dangerous than others, many behavioural problems stem from the fact that the dog has not been properly trained and has not been set any boundaries. For example fighting dogs such as the pit bull terrier (which are illegal to own in the UK) may appeal to people who use them as accessories to make them appear tough and powerful. However, they also train or breed them to develop fighting or aggressive tendencies by encouraging barking or biting and by isolating them so that the dogs become aggressive around strangers and other dogs in order for the owner to look tough. Dogs are usually very good family pets. However, as well as being good for belonging to a family it can also produce problems if the dog is untrained, encouraged to be aggressive or his welfare is ignored. Sadly around 30% of dogs in rescue centres are there through incidence of aggression which in many cases could have been avoided. This course deals with the subject of why dogs are aggressive and how to deal with aggressive behaviour in canines. Figures from the Health and Social Care Information Centre show that 6,450 people were admitted during the 12 months to April this year, compared with 6,130 the previous year.

The worst-affected group were children aged under 10, who accounted for more than 1,000 admissions. Three-quarters of those children needed surgery.

Of the 1,040 admissions among children aged under 10 for dog bites and strikes, 494 admissions were for plastic surgery and 278 were to the oral and facial surgery unit.

Module 1 of this course explores the risk factors associated with aggression and the different categories of aggression.

Module 2 is concerned with professional ethics. Canine behaviour practitioners and dog trainers who work for human clients have an obligation to both the dog and the human client.

Conflict can arise between the interests of the dog and the interests of the human client. Occasionally, clients may want the behaviourists to employ inhumane methods.

Before you begin taking on clients it is essential to develop your own code of practice and have a clear sense of ethical values.

Module 3 examines biological influences on aggression including various neurotransmitters, medical conditions that can influence aggression and the role of stress.

Module 4 looks at genetic influences and how aggression can be prevented from happening in the first place. Bite inhibition is discussed in depth. Module 4 also looks at the use of aversive techniques and why these should not be used, including the controversial role of electric collars, e-collars, vibrating collars etc. Even at the lowest setting, electrical stimulation devices present an unknown stimulus to dogs which, when not paired with a positive stimulus, at best is neutral and at worst is frightening/painful to the animal.  

Studies indicate that dogs trained with shock displayed stress signals as they approached the training area and frequently work slowly and deliberately. In many instances, electrical stimulation causes physiological pain and psychological stress to the dog, often exhibited by vocalisation, urination, defecation, fleeing and complete shut-down. In extreme cases, electrical stimulation devices may even cause burns. If desired results are not immediate, many users of electrical stimulation devices will increase the level of stimulation, which often results in the dog attempting to escape or avoid the stimulus and even total shut down where he will refuse to perform. Very little learning can occur when this happens. 

Some dogs have high pain thresholds and may fail to show a pain response despite increased levels of electrical stimulation. Other dogs may become habituated to the pain and endure it, causing trainers to increase the level and frequency of electrical stimulation. The pain and stress caused in such situations has a significant effect on a dog’s physiology, increasing cortisol levels and heart rate.

Module 5 explores the components and principles of a behaviour change programme and Module 6 looks at case studies.  Module 6 includes a case study for you to work on.


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